Build Log: Trumpeter 1:700 USS Lexington (CV-2), pt. 1: The Hull

It’s been more than a week since my last post.  That isn’t from a declining interest in either this blog or the completion of my current project, but rather a direct effect of the release of the new expansion pack for Civilization V.  That’s right – I’m a dork for more than just modeling. 🙂

While this has slowed my progress, it certainly hasn’t stopped it, and I’m happy to report the completion of phase one of this build: Lexington’s hull has been painted, accessorized, and detailed, and now awaits the completion of the flight deck to make it a solid piece.  Here’s a look back at how the project has been going these past few weeks.

This kit requires the builder to add and shape the hull modifications added to Lexington during her 1937 refit.

This kit requires the builder to add and shape the hull modifications added to Lexington during her 1937 refit.

The main body of the hull comes together easily enough, consisting of the forward hull slopes, a series of gun tubs, and the stern galley deck.

The main body of the hull comes together easily enough, consisting of the forward hull slopes, a series of gun tubs, and the stern galley deck.

The boat pockets on this kit include basic stairs leading down from a catwalk platform, but the Gold Medal Models photo-etch set I picked up includes nice replacements for these...

The boat pockets on this kit include basic stairs leading down from a catwalk platform, but the Gold Medal Models photo-etch set I picked up includes nice replacements for these…

...while the other pockets were converted in 1942 to hold banks of Oerlikon 20mm cannon.

…while the other pockets were converted in 1942 to hold banks of Oerlikon 20mm cannon.

Speaking of Oerlikons, does anybody else hear the theme to "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" when they see this?

Speaking of Oerlikons, does anybody else hear the theme to “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” when they see this?

Some of the photo-etch railing and ammunition racks after being added to the 5" gun mounts.

Some of the photo-etch railing and ammunition racks after being added to the 5″ gun mounts…

...and here is the entire battery after painting.

…and here is the entire battery after painting.

A completed boat pocket.  I abhor brush painting, but there was little realistic path for adding the white to the superstructure of the motorboat.  Fortunately, this piece is barely .5" long, so the finished effect is negligible.

A completed boat pocket. I abhor brush painting, but there was little realistic path for adding the white to the superstructure of the motorboat. Fortunately, this piece is barely .5″ long, so the finished effect is negligible.

The same component attached to the hull proper.

The same component attached to the hull proper.

And, at last, the completed hull.

And, at last, the completed hull.

At the time of her loss, Lexington was painted in Measure 11 Naval Camouflage: Navy Blue on all surfaces except the flight deck (which was painted Norfolk 250N Flight Deck Stain).  Standing in for Navy Blue on this kit is Tamiya acrylic’s XF-18 Medium Blue.  I looked at a paint chip of the prototype and saw no issue with using the Tamiya variant instead.  The uniformity of the color does make for a more bland appearance, but we are going for realism here, right?

Stay tuned for more updates on this kit as it progresses, as well as the conclusion of our history lesson concerning the fate of Lexington.  My model table is about to become a veritable shipyard with the kits that I have in my queue, so watch for additional subjects in the near future as well.  Until then, friends, take care, and happy modeling.

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One thought on “Build Log: Trumpeter 1:700 USS Lexington (CV-2), pt. 1: The Hull

  1. Pingback: Rumors of my demise have been greatly exaggerated (Lexington CV-2 Build Log pt. 2) | The Museum Modeler

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